Luke French (Baseball Player) Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Net Worth

is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He was selected by the Detroit Tigers in the eighth round of the 2004 Major League Baseball Draft. French debuted with the Tigers in 2009, then played with the Seattle Mariners in 2009 and 2010.

Find Below Wiki Age, weight, Height, Net Worth as Wikipedia, Wife, There is no question is the most popular & Rising celebrity of all the time. You can know about the net worth Luke this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got wealth at the age of 37. He has a kind heart and lovely personality. below you find everything about him.

Luke French Wiki, Biography

Date of BirthSeptember 13, 1985
Birth DaySeptember 13
Birth Years1985
Age37 years old
Birth PlaceSalina, Kansas
Birth CitySalina
Birth CountryUnited States of America
NationalityFrench
Famous AsAthlete
Also Known forAthlete
Zodiac SignVirgo
OccupationAthlete

Also Known by the Full name Lucas Stephen French, is a Good Athlete. He was born on September 13, 1985, in Salina, Kansas.Salina is a beautiful and populous city located in Salina, Kansas United States of America.

Early Life Story, Family Background and Education

Luke was born to Greg and Colleen French on September 13, 1985, in Salina, Kansas. He grew up rooting for the Seattle Mariners, listing Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, and Jay Buhner among his favorite players. At Heritage High School in Littleton, Colorado, he played football, basketball, and baseball. After his freshman year, he stopped playing football to focus more on baseball; then after his sophomore year, he quit basketball for the same reason. As a senior, he was a Louisville Slugger Preseason High School All-American selection.

French was selected to play in the inaugural Aflac All-America High School Baseball Classic on August 23, 2003 at Hammond Stadium in Ft. Myers, Florida. He said this about the experience:

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Lucas Stephen French Net Worth

Lucas Stephen French has a net worth of $1.5 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as Athlete. Famously known as the Athlete of United States of America. He is seen as one of the most successful Athlete of all times. Lucas Stephen French Wealth & Primary Source of earning is being a successful French Athlete.

Luke entered the career as Athlete In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022$0.5 Million to $1.5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021)Being Updated
Earning in 2021Not Available
Annual SalaryBeing Updated
Cars InfoNot Available
Income SourceAthlete

Social Network

Born on September 13, 1985, the Athlete is Probably the most famous person on social media. Luke is a popular celebrity and social media influencer. With his huge number of social media followers, he frequently shares numerous individual media files for viewers to comment with his massive amount of support from followers across all major social media sites. Affectively interact with and touch his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

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InstagramNot Available
FacebookLuke French Facebook Profile
Wikipedia Wikipedia
YouTubeNot Available
SpotifyNot Available
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Life Story & Timeline

2013

He made his major league debut on May 15 in the 9th inning of a 14–1 victory over the Oakland Athletics. French appeared in one more game before being optioned back to Toledo on May 21 after Robertson returned from the disabled list.

At Toledo, French went 4–4 with a 2.98 ERA in 13 games (all starts). He was called up at the end of June, this time to serve as a starter, replacing Alfredo Figaro on the Tigers’ roster. On July 3, he made his first major league start, holding the Minnesota Twins to two runs over ​4  ⁄3 innings. He got a no-decision, but the Tigers won 11–9. Six days later, he logged his first major league win, holding the Kansas City Royals to one run over ​6  ⁄3 innings in a 3–1 triumph, defeating Zack Greinke, who would go on to win the American League (AL) Cy Young Award in 2009. It was his only win in seven games (five starts) for the Tigers through the end of July, but French posted a 3.38 ERA in that span.

French replaced Washburn in Seattle’s rotation and won his first start for the Mariners. In his August 5 debut, he gave up four runs over five innings but again defeated the Royals in an 11–6 victory. On August 15, he was the losing pitcher in a 5–2 defeat by the New York Yankees, but all four runs French allowed were unearned, the result of a Franklin Gutiérrez error in the second inning. After he started for the Mariners on September 5, manager Don Wakamatsu moved him to the bullpen so the team could use Brandon Morrow in the starting rotation. French was only used once the rest of the year, on September 19. In eight games (seven starts) for Seattle, he had a 3–3 record, a 6.63 ERA, 23 strikeouts, and 54 hits allowed in 38 innings. His combined totals between Seattle and Detroit were a 4–5 record, a 5.21 ERA, 42 strikeouts, and 87 hits allowed in ​67  ⁄3 innings.

After Ryan Rowland-Smith was placed on the disabled list, French was called up on July 28 to take his spot in the Mariners’ rotation. He remained in the rotation the rest of the year. On August 6, he again beat Greinke and the Royals, limiting Kansas City to one run over eight innings in a 7–1 victory. Eleven days later against the Baltimore Orioles, he had a no-hitter going until Josh Bell had a single with one out in the sixth inning, but he allowed no runs in ​7  ⁄3 innings as the Mariners won 4–0. On August 29, he held the Twins to three hits in seven innings. One of the hits was a home run by Michael Cuddyer, but Seattle scored two runs to defeat Minnesota 2–1. Five days later, French carried a no-hitter through six innings before Shelley Duncan singled with one out in the seventh. He finished the game with seven scoreless innings and got the win as Seattle beat the Cleveland Indians 1–0.

2012

French signed a minor league contract with the Minnesota Twins on January 27, 2012. He split the season between the Eastern League’s New Britain Rock Cats and the International League’s Rochester Red Wings. In nine starts for New Britain, he had a 4–1 record, a 2.10 ERA, 27 strikeouts, and 35 hits allowed in ​55  ⁄3 innings. With Rochester, he appeared in 19 games, 14 of which were starts. He had a 1–5 record, a 6.42 ERA, 49 strikeouts, and 90 hits allowed in ​74  ⁄3 innings. On November 3, he became a free agent.

2011

French participated in spring training in 2011 for the Mariners, competing for a long relief spot in the bullpen. He was sent to Tacoma at the end of spring training. On August 13, 2011, French was designated for assignment by the Mariners to allow Wily Mo Peña onto the team’s 40-man roster. In 26 starts for Tacoma, he had a 9–9 record, a 6.27 ERA, and 81 strikeouts in ​146  ⁄3 innings. He ranked among PCL leaders in runs allowed (115, second to Alan Johnson’s 118), earned runs allowed (102, second to Johnson’s 109 and Chris Seddon’s 104), and hits allowed (196, fifth in the PCL). The Mariners allowed him to become a free agent after the season.

2010

With Seattle, French replaced Washburn in the starting rotation. He had more wins that year with them than he did in Detroit, but his earned run average (ERA) was higher. In 2010, he split the year between the Mariners and the Triple-A Tacoma Rainiers, though after Ryan Rowland-Smith was placed on the disabled list on July 28, he spent the rest of the year in the Mariners’ starting rotation. Twice, he took a no-hitter through five innings. At Tacoma, he tied for fifth in the Pacific Coast League in wins despite only pitching half the season for them; in Seattle, he had a 5–7 record and a 4.83 ERA. French would never appear in a Major League Baseball game again after 2010. He spent all of 2011 with Tacoma, where his ERA was 6.27. Allowed to become a free agent after the season, he pitched one final season in the Minnesota Twins organization in 2012.

In 2010, French started the season with Tacoma, where he had a 6–2 record and a 1.93 ERA (second in the league) through June 6. On that day, he was recalled by the Mariners to work out of the bullpen when Doug Fister went on the disabled list. He made two relief appearances and started a game on June 14 in place of Ian Snell, who had not been pitching well. French allowed four runs in four innings in a 9–3 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. Four days later, French was optioned back to Tacoma. He was briefly recalled on July 9, making a relief appearance against the Yankees before being sent back to Tacoma the next day.

His season ended poorly, as he gave up eight runs in four innings on October 1 against the Oakland Athletics in what ESPN called “the worst of his 13 [2010] starts for the Mariners.” French glumly reviewed his performance, saying, “All I can say is it wasn’t my night. It’s going to happen. It’s not very fun, not the way you want to end the season.”

In 17 starts for Tacoma in 2010, French had an 11–3 record, a 2.94 ERA, 63 strikeouts, and 109 hits allowed in ​113  ⁄3 innings pitched. Though he only made 17 starts for Tacoma, his 11 wins tied with six others for fifth in the league. Additionally, his .786 winning percentage was the third-highest among starters with at least 100 innings pitched in the PCL. In 16 games (13 starts) with Seattle, he had a 5–7 record, a 4.83 ERA, 37 strikeouts, and 88 hits allowed in ​87  ⁄3 innings.

2009

Born in Kansas, French attended Heritage High School in Littleton, Colorado, where he was a Louisville Slugger Preseason High School All-American in his senior year. Drafted by the Tigers, he spent the next several years in their minor league system before making his debut with the team in 2009. He won his first game in the major leagues on July 9, then was traded to the Mariners on July 31 as part of a deal that brought Jarrod Washburn to Detroit to help the Tigers try to win the American League Central Division.

In 2009, French began the year with the Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens of the International League. He was called up to the Tigers on May 14, 2009, when Nate Robertson was placed on the disabled list retroactive to May 6. He said he was very excited about the chance to pitch in the major leagues:

Though they led the AL Central through the 2009 season’s first four months, the Tigers wanted some help for their rotation as they sought to make the playoffs. On July 31, 2009, French and prospect Mauricio Robles were traded to the Seattle Mariners for Jarrod Washburn. The trade brought French to the team he rooted for as a kid:

Before he reached the major leagues in 2009, French married his wife, Blythe. He threw a fastball, slider, and changeup during his baseball career. When the Tigers played the Mariners in 2009, Griffey (back with the Mariners for his final season) gave French, who was a fan of his growing up, an autographed jersey. Griffey later became his teammate on the Mariners. “Mike Sweeney and I were talking when he walked up and stood there near us,” Griffey recalled French’s first day with the team. “We knew he wanted to introduce himself, so when we were done talking, both of us turned and started to walk away. Luke had his hand out and he just stared. Then I turned around and said, ‘I’m just messin’ with you.'”

2008

French earned a promotion to the Double-A Erie SeaWolves in 2008. He went 9–11 with a 4.02 ERA in 27 games (26 starts). French led the Eastern League with 170 innings pitched and 195 hits allowed, while he tied Brad Bergesen and Magee for the lead with three complete games, finished second with the same amount of losses as four other starters (11, behind Magee’s 13), and gave up the fifth-most walks in the league (60, tied for fifth with Kyle Aselton).

2007

For the 2007 season, French spent the whole year with Lakeland. He finished second in the FSL with 14 losses (behind Zach Ward with 17), tied for second with 27 starts (tied with three others behind Tyler Norrick’s 28), and finished fourth with 149 innings pitched (behind Norrick’s ​165  ⁄3 , Drew Carpenter’s 163, and Brandon Magee’s ​156  ⁄3 ) in 2007.

2006

French spent all of 2006 with West Michigan. Used exclusively as a starter in his 26 appearances, he had an 11–8 record, a 3.72 ERA, 94 strikeouts, and 156 hits allowed in ​157  ⁄3 innings pitched. His 11 wins tied with three other starters for seventh in the Midwest League, and his ​157  ⁄3 innings pitched ranked sixth.

2004

At the end of his senior year, French was drafted by the Detroit Tigers in the eighth round of the 2004 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft.

In 2004, French began his minor league career with the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League (GCL) Tigers. In 11 games (10 starts), he had a 1–3 record, a 2.74 earned run average (ERA), 49 strikeouts, and 19 walks in ​49  ⁄3 innings pitched. French split the next season between the GCL Tigers, the Single-A West Michigan Whitecaps of the Midwest League, and the Single-A advanced Lakeland Tigers of the Florida State League (FSL). In 12 starts among all three, he had a 5–3 record, a 5.45 ERA, 50 strikeouts, and 87 hits allowed in ​67  ⁄3 innings pitched.

2003

French was selected to play in the inaugural Aflac All-America High School Baseball Classic on August 23, 2003 at Hammond Stadium in Ft. Myers, Florida. He said this about the experience:

1985

Lucas Stephen French (born September 13, 1985) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He was selected by the Detroit Tigers in the eighth round of the 2004 Major League Baseball Draft. French debuted with the Tigers in 2009, then played with the Seattle Mariners in 2009 and 2010.

Luke was born to Greg and Colleen French on September 13, 1985, in Salina, Kansas. He grew up rooting for the Seattle Mariners, listing Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, and Jay Buhner among his favorite players. At Heritage High School in Littleton, Colorado, he played football, basketball, and baseball. After his freshman year, he stopped playing football to focus more on baseball; then after his sophomore year, he quit basketball for the same reason. As a senior, he was a Louisville Slugger Preseason High School All-American selection.

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