Jesse Freeston Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Net Worth

is a Canadian video journalist and filmmaker. He attended Hillcrest High School, where he excelled in volleyball and chemistry. While attending Hillcrest he met his soon-to-be mentor, Mr. Taguchi. Jesse and Mr. Taguchi would spend their evenings walking around the Alta Vista area talking about space and neat science experiments. After watching Bowling For Columbine Jesse thought it would be fun to make Youtube videos. Now his work focuses primarily on social movements in North and Central America, but he has also done investigative work around topics such as the military-industrial complex, the global economic crisis, and undocumented migration. Prior to this his goal was to make funny videos for Youtube. He is mostly known for exposing fraud in the Honduran election of 2009, and for his coverage of the 2010 G-20 summit in Toronto, where Freeston himself was attacked by an officer with the Toronto Police Service before having his microphone ripped from his hand by another officer. His video-journalism work with The Real News Network, which is all licensed copyleft, has been republished by numerous outlets, including The Huffington Post, Common Dreams and Le monde diplomatique. In 2012, he made three 30-minute Spanish-language documentaries for TeleSUR. He is currently finishing a feature-length documentary on the plantation occupation movement in Honduras’ Lower Aguan Valley.

Find Below Wiki Age, weight, Height, Net Worth as Wikipedia, Wife, There is no question is the most popular & Rising celebrity of all the time. You can know about the net worth Jesse this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got wealth at the age of 37. He has a kind heart and lovely personality. below you find everything about him.

Jesse Freeston Wiki, Biography

Date of BirthFebruary 18, 1985
Birth DayFebruary 18
Birth Years1985
Age37 years old
Birth PlaceCanada
Birth City
Birth CountryCanada
NationalityCanadian
Famous AsJournalist
Also Known forJournalist
Zodiac SignAries
OccupationJournalist

Also Known by the Full name Jesse Freeston, is a Good Journalist. He was born on February 18, 1985, in Canada

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Jesse Freeston Net Worth

Jesse Freeston has a net worth of $1.5 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as Journalist. Famously known as the Journalist of Canada. He is seen as one of the most successful Journalist of all times. Jesse Freeston Wealth & Primary Source of earning is being a successful Canadian Journalist.

Jesse entered the career as Journalist In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022$0.5 Million to $1.5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021)Being Updated
Earning in 2021Not Available
Annual SalaryBeing Updated
Cars InfoNot Available
Income SourceJournalist

Social Network

Born on February 18, 1985, the Journalist is Probably the most famous person on social media. Jesse is a popular celebrity and social media influencer. With his huge number of social media followers, he frequently shares numerous individual media files for viewers to comment with his massive amount of support from followers across all major social media sites. Affectively interact with and touch his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

TwitterNot Available
InstagramNot Available
FacebookNot Available
Wikipedia Wikipedia
YouTubeNot Available
SpotifyNot Available
WebsiteNot Available
ItunesNot Available
PandoraNot Available
GoogleplayNot Available
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Life Story & Timeline

2012

In 2012, Freeston made three 30-minute documentaries for the Latin American television network, TeleSUR. Informar y Resistir en Honduras details the repression of critical journalists in post-coup Honduras, and includes interviews with numerous survivors. ¿Un sueño aplazado? is a look at activism in the United States following the Occupy Wall Street movement. Also in the U.S., Todo está bien argues that the two major political parties deny the true nature of the ongoing economic crisis, the film focuses on the regions of Detroit and Central Appalachia, alongside interviews with Noam Chomsky and Richard D. Wolff.

Resistencia finished in second place at the Cuban Hat Pitch Contest at the 2012 Montreal International Documentary Festival. The film raised $21,210 through a crowdfunding campaign on the website Indiegogo. It is expected to be released sometime in 2013.

2010

During the 2010 G-20 Summit in Toronto, Freeston published a series of video stories for The Real News. Most of his stories focused on police brutality and repression against activists before, during, and after the Summit. Freeston was himself the target of police violence when he was attacked during one of the demonstrations. He spoke about the event in a CTV interview after the incident. “I was taken back by my collar, I was thrown against bikes and then one officer punched me twice in the mouth.” In another CTV interview he added, “I then had my mic stolen from me by one of the officers as you’ll see in the tape, and it was only after a few other journalists gathered around and put pressure on them that they returned my mic within a few minutes.” When asked whether he believes he was targeted, he answered, “there’s a pattern here, we’ve seen numbers of journalists that have gone through similar things. I wasn’t detained, but there are numerous journalists who were detained and we see a real pattern here throughout the weekend of journalists being denied access.” Freeston filed an official complaint with the Office of the Independent Police Review Director, but as of June 2011, he had received no response.

2009

Since the 2009 Honduran coup d’état, Freeston has produced roughly 30 mini-documentaries on the coup and the rise of the National People’s Resistance Front. He has covered the post-coup struggles of various groups such as the students and teachers, the feminists, the musicians and ousted president Zelaya’s return to Honduras. However, his prime focus has been on the land conflict in the Bajo Aguán part of Honduras’ Aguán River Valley following the December 2009 occupation of more than 10,000 hectares of palm oil plantations by the Aguan Unified Campesino Movement. According to Devlin Kuyek of GRAIN, Freeston’s video documenting the burning to the ground of the village of Rigores by Honduran police “vividly illustrates the courageous struggle for land and food sovereignty that peasants in Honduras are waging against the ruthless combined force of agribusiness and national and foreign governments.” Freeston is currently in post-production on a feature-length documentary on the land conflict in the Aguan Valley.

In November 2009, the Honduran coup regime held elections that, in Freeston’s words, “laundered a military coup”. In a December 6, 2009 report from the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa, Freeston provided evidence that the election was more theatre than democratic practice. In particular, he exposed that the Honduran Supreme Electoral Tribunal’s own internal figures on voter turnout were not 65% as election winner Pepe Lobo and Western media reported, but actually 49%. His conclusion was that no one could know for sure how many Hondurans voted, given that the election was run by the same military that overthrew the elected president five months earlier, and that all international election monitoring groups (including the UN, Organization of American States, Carter Center, and EU) refused to observe the election. On December 22, 2009, Freeston was featured on Honduras’ Radio Globo alongside ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya and American University Anthropologist Adrienne Pine, where he spoke about electoral fraud.

In 2008, Freeston reported from El Salvador on Canadian mining company Pacific Rim’s attempt to open an industrial gold mine in the Central American country. He documented how the company hired ‘promoters’ in communities opposed to mining, a move that led to violence in a phenomenon the Salvadoran social movement began to call “social contamination”. His video reports for The Real News document the popular resistance to mining and the $100 million lawsuit Pacific Rim launched against the government of El Salvador itself for alleged losses when, after months of exploration, it was denied a mining permit. In a November 15, 2009 story for The Real News, Freeston interviewed Tom Shrake, the CEO and President of Pacific Rim about the lawsuit. Shrake claimed Pacific Rim followed El Salvador’s mining, investment, and environmental laws and was therefore denied a mining permit illegally. Freeston’s investigation from San Isidro revealed contamination of the country’s little-accessible water during the exploration stage, the inflammation of conflict by company promoters, the perception that the 2% tax Pacific Rim would pay on its revenues, and other social and environmental concerns were behind the resistance to the proposed mining project. He also reported on cases of murder and torture of anti-mining activists, such as that of Gustavo Marcelo Rivera. The Rivera family maintains that Rivera was killed for his opposition to the mining project and the local leadership that supports it.

In 2009, Freeston covered the El Salvadoran elections from the country’s capital, San Salvador. He documented the historic ascension to power of former guerrilla group FMLN and their presidential candidate, former journalist Mauricio Funes. According to Freeston, it marked the first time in 500 years that a leader not supported by the tiny Salvadoran elite would take a position of power in the country.

1985

Jesse Freeston (born February 18, 1985) is a Canadian video journalist and filmmaker. He attended Hillcrest High School, where he excelled in volleyball and chemistry. While attending Hillcrest he met his soon-to-be mentor, Mr. Taguchi. Jesse and Mr. Taguchi would spend their evenings walking around the Alta Vista area talking about space and neat science experiments. After watching Bowling For Columbine Jesse thought it would be fun to make Youtube videos. Now his work focuses primarily on social movements in North and Central America, but he has also done investigative work around topics such as the military-industrial complex, the global economic crisis, and undocumented migration. Prior to this his goal was to make funny videos for Youtube. He is mostly known for exposing fraud in the Honduran election of 2009, and for his coverage of the 2010 G-20 summit in Toronto, where Freeston himself was attacked by an officer with the Toronto Police Service before having his microphone ripped from his hand by another officer. His video-journalism work with The Real News Network, which is all licensed copyleft, has been republished by numerous outlets, including The Huffington Post, Common Dreams and Le monde diplomatique. In 2012, he made three 30-minute Spanish-language documentaries for TeleSUR. He is currently finishing a feature-length documentary on the plantation occupation movement in Honduras’ Lower Aguan Valley.

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